The Scientist

» genome, developmental biology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

By | August 3, 2017

The paper describing the gene-editing method is retracted.

0 Comments

image: Details Published on CRISPR-treated Embryos

Details Published on CRISPR-treated Embryos

By | August 2, 2017

Scientists correct a mutation in fertilized eggs that causes a severe cardiac disease.

0 Comments

image: Scientists Destroy Entire Chromosome with CRISPR

Scientists Destroy Entire Chromosome with CRISPR

By | August 1, 2017

Multiple DNA breaks at either the centromere or the long arm of the mouse Y chromosome cause it to fragment and disappear.

1 Comment

image: Human Genetic Variation May Complicate CRISPR

Human Genetic Variation May Complicate CRISPR

By | July 31, 2017

Slight sequence differences confound target sites in precision genome-editing, a study shows.

0 Comments

Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

0 Comments

image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

1 Comment

image: Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

By | July 17, 2017

An estimate derived from fertility rates concludes that at least 75 percent of our DNA has no critical utility.

10 Comments

Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

0 Comments

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium aims to characterize the entire mouse genome, starting first with more than 3,300 genes. 

0 Comments

image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  2. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  3. Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age
    News Analysis Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

    T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

  4. Search for Life on the Red Planet
FreeShip