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image: Week in Review: November 10–14

Week in Review: November 10–14

By Jef Akst | November 14, 2014

Funding for African science; microbiome studies may have contamination worries; mind-controlled gene expression; DNA record keeper


image: DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

By Kerry Grens | November 11, 2014

Sequencing study reveals low levels of microbes in lab reagents that can create big problems for some microbiome studies.

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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By Bob Grant | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.


image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.


image: Soil Microbiome of Central Park

Soil Microbiome of Central Park

By Jef Akst | September 30, 2014

Nearly 600 soil samples from New York City’s famous park reveal that the urban environment harbors just as much biodiversity as natural ecosystems across the globe.

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image: Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

By Molly Sharlach | September 23, 2014

Lengthy stints in intensive care units pare down patients’ gut microflora, a study shows.


image: Small Molecule Superstore

Small Molecule Superstore

By Molly Sharlach | September 15, 2014

An analysis of bacterial sequences from the Human Microbiome Project has uncovered thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters.


image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By Jef Akst | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.


image: Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | August 21, 2014

Marine viruses may be key players in the death of massive algal blooms that emerge in the ocean, a study shows.


image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

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