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image: The Downside of Antibiotics?

The Downside of Antibiotics?

By Ruth Williams | July 3, 2013

Bacteria-killing antibiotics might also damage a person’s tissues.


image: Temperature-Sensing Fat Cells

Temperature-Sensing Fat Cells

By Dan Cossins | July 1, 2013

Researchers discover that unlike brown fat cells, white fat cells can directly sense cooling temperatures to switch on genes that control heat production.

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image: Father of Crystallography Dies

Father of Crystallography Dies

By Jeffrey Denoncourt | June 17, 2013

Nobel Laureate Jerome Karle has passed away at age 94.


image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By Sabrina Richards | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.


image: Opioid Receptors Implicated in PTSD

Opioid Receptors Implicated in PTSD

By Dan Cossins | June 7, 2013

A compound that targets a particular opioid receptor in the amygdala reduces the formation of PTSD-like systems in mice subjected to severe trauma.


image: Bird Flu Mutation Risk

Bird Flu Mutation Risk

By Ed Yong | June 6, 2013

Some H5N1 and H7N9 bird flu viruses could be one mutation away from spreading efficiently between humans.


image: Muscle Disease Gene Identified in Fish

Muscle Disease Gene Identified in Fish

By Ed Yong | June 4, 2013

Scientists discover gene behind an inherited muscle disorder by studying zebrafish embryos.


image: Week in Review: May 27–30

Week in Review: May 27–30

By Jef Akst | May 31, 2013

The mosquito’s role in malaria virulence; the value of grant review; Europe must embrace GM crops; why roaches avoid sugary bait


image: Gene Transfer Beats Some Flu Strains

Gene Transfer Beats Some Flu Strains

By Dan Cossins | May 31, 2013

Mice and ferrets are protected from several deadly viruses when genes encoding “broadly neutralizing antibodies” are delivered into their nasal passages.


Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.


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