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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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image: Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

By | October 31, 2017

Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex. 

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image: Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

By | October 30, 2017

Women who ate more produce known to harbor pesticides were less likely to succeed with fertility treatment than women who ate fewer of these fruits and vegetables.

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image: Image of the Day: Fear Center

Image of the Day: Fear Center

By | October 26, 2017

A set of neurons in the brain’s central amygdala plays a key role in forming memories of aversive experiences, scientists find in mice.  

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image: Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

Image of the Day: CRISPR on a Mouse Canvas

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists are using CRISPR-Cas9 technology to tag and explore specific sets of neurons in mice, in one of the first steps towards building a comprehensive atlas of brain circuitry. 

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image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By , , and | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.

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image: WHO Cherry-Picked Data on Pesticide, Investigation Finds

WHO Cherry-Picked Data on Pesticide, Investigation Finds

By | October 22, 2017

A group evaluating glyphosate’s cancer risk omitted evidence that the chemical is not carcinogenic.

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image: Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

By | October 18, 2017

People who read normally tend to have one dominant eye while people with dyslexia do not, research shows.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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Plantings of non-GM refuges counter the development of resistance.

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