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image: Week in Review

Week in Review

By | March 15, 2013

Disgruntled Nobel loser sues; brain trauma researchers search for biomarker of a chronic condition; receptor for novel coronavirus found; the rise of transcriptomics; and ethical oversight of participant-led research

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image: Novel Virus Entry Portal Found

Novel Virus Entry Portal Found

By | March 13, 2013

Researchers identify the target protein of a recently discovered human coronavirus, shedding light on infection and possible interspecies spread.

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image: Opinion:  Unconventional Standards

Opinion: Unconventional Standards

By | March 13, 2013

Tailoring ethical oversight to participant-led research

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image: Networking Medicine

Networking Medicine

By | March 2, 2013

Although fully organized patient-run trials are still few and far between, patients are taking a more active role in clinical research.

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image: Do-It-Yourself Medicine

Do-It-Yourself Medicine

By | March 1, 2013

Patients are sidestepping clinical research and using themselves as guinea pigs to test new treatments for fatal diseases. Will they hurt themselves, or science?

9 Comments

image: Stem Cell Trial Nearly Approved

Stem Cell Trial Nearly Approved

By | February 15, 2013

The first human trial of a treatment using induced pluripotent stem cells has received conditional approval from an institutional review board in Japan.

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image: Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

By | February 5, 2013

Tuberculosis bacteria find shelter from drugs and the body’s defenses in bone marrow stem cells.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Health Booth 2020

Opinion: Health Booth 2020

By | February 4, 2013

Using a SMART card containing your genetic information and medical history, you could one day soon be diagnosed and treated for all kinds of diseases at an ATM-style kiosk.

3 Comments

image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

2 Comments

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