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image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By Kelly Rae Chi | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination


image: Patchy Plankton

Patchy Plankton

By Chris Palmer | December 1, 2013

Turbulence interacts with the stabilizing efforts of motile phytoplankton to create small-scale patches of toxic, bloom-forming organisms.

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image: Weathering the Storm

Weathering the Storm

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2013

How to prepare your lab for natural disasters and cope with unavoidable consequences

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image: Tracking Fecal Transplants

Tracking Fecal Transplants

By Tracy Vence | November 26, 2013

A long-term study confirms transplants of stool microbes from healthy donors can successfully clear recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.


image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By Jef Akst | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.


image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By Abby Olena | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.


image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By Jef Akst | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.


image: Don’t Fear DIYbio

Don’t Fear DIYbio

By Jef Akst | November 19, 2013

Biological tinkerers are not the risk that some have made them out to be, according to a new report.


image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By Abby Olena | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.


image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By Tracy Vence | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

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