The Scientist

» drug addiction and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By Jef Akst | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

4 Comments

image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By Ashley P. Taylor | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

0 Comments

image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By Kate Yandell | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By Kate Yandell | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

By Tracy Vence | March 31, 2016

Boston-based Commense plans to develop microbial and nonmicrobial interventions aimed at improving child health.

0 Comments

image: Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

By Jef Akst | March 23, 2016

The bacterial communities in the eyes of contact lens wearers resemble those of the skin, according to a study. 

0 Comments

image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By Bob Grant | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

0 Comments

image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By Bob Grant | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By Rob Knight and Jack Gilbert | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

0 Comments

image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By Jef Akst | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Dartmouth Professor Investigated for Sexual Misconduct Retires
  2. Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud
    The Nutshell Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud

    Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges that allege the company’s promise to revolutionize blood testing swindled investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and put patients in danger.

  3. Laxative Causes Long-Term Changes to Mouse Microbiome
  4. Probiotics Prevent Cholera in Animal Models