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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

By | October 19, 2015

Using autoantibodies as biomarkers, researchers could soon identify people at the highest risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases much earlier than existing methods.

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image: Cognitive Neuroscience Lurking in Art

Cognitive Neuroscience Lurking in Art

By | October 19, 2015

What can neuroscientists learn from the masters and other artists?

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image: Newfound Neurons

Newfound Neurons

By | October 19, 2015

Researchers identify a new type of brain cell in male Caenorhabditis elegans.

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image: Neurons from Glia In Vivo

Neurons from Glia In Vivo

By | October 19, 2015

Scientists present new recipes for directly converting glial cells to neurons in mouse brains.

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image: Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

By | October 12, 2015

Neural connectome patterns differ enough between people to use them as a fingerprint.

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image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

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image: Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain

Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Neuron nurseries in the adult brains of rodents and humans appear to influence cognitive function.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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