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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

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image: Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

By | March 31, 2016

Boston-based Commense plans to develop microbial and nonmicrobial interventions aimed at improving child health.

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image: Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

By | March 23, 2016

The bacterial communities in the eyes of contact lens wearers resemble those of the skin, according to a study. 

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image: New Test for Zika OKed

New Test for Zika OKed

By | March 22, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration gave emergency approval for a combination diagnostic that can distinguish between Zika, dengue, and chikungunya infections.

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image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

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image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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