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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By Ashley P. Taylor | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By Ashley Yeager | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf

The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf

By Mary Bates | September 22, 2017

In a case of acoustic deception, caterpillars mimic bird alarm calls to defend themselves.

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image: How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

By Abby Olena | September 21, 2017

Amphibians resist their own chemical defenses with amino acid modifications in the sequence for a target receptor.

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Researchers recommend greater conservation efforts toward non-mammals and small creatures.

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image: Second Chance for Lost Galapagos Tortoises?

Second Chance for Lost Galapagos Tortoises?

By Bob Grant | September 14, 2017

Researchers are trying to recreate an extinct species of the lumbering reptiles by breeding closely related species that contain traces of the lost lineage’s DNA.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

By David Moscato | September 8, 2017

High-profile cases of poached fossils shine a light on the black market for paleontological specimens—and how scientists and governments are trying to stop it.

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By Ruth Williams | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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