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 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

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image: Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds

Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds

By | March 1, 2017

Some bat vocalizations resemble bird songs, though at higher frequencies, and as researchers unveil the behaviors’ neural underpinnings, the similarities may run even deeper.

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image: Researchers Study Rodent Songs They Can’t Hear

Researchers Study Rodent Songs They Can’t Hear

By | March 1, 2017

Mice and rats produce ultrasonic signals to attract mates.

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: From Squeaks to Song

From Squeaks to Song

By | May 1, 2012

House mice sing melodies out of the range of human hearing, and the crooning is impacting research from evolutionary biology to neuroscience.

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