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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Convergent Fish Fins

Convergent Fish Fins

By | March 5, 2014

Adipose fins, long considered vestigial, may have evolved multiple times as a key adaptation in some fish, study finds.

1 Comment

image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | February 6, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

5 Comments

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