The Scientist

» viral vectors and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

0 Comments

image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

26 Comments

image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

0 Comments

image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

0 Comments

Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

0 Comments

Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

0 Comments

image: A Method to Detect Zika-Blocking Bacteria

A Method to Detect Zika-Blocking Bacteria

By | July 5, 2016

A team of scientists confirm Wolbachia can prevent mosquitoes from transmitting the virus, while another group finds a reliable way to detect the bacteria.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Target the Vector

Opinion: Target the Vector

By | June 28, 2016

Officials’ increased emphasis on mosquito control could benefit public health efforts beyond the ongoing Zika outbreak. 

1 Comment

image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College London
  2. Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
  3. How Do Infant Immune Systems Learn to Tolerate Gut Bacteria?
  4. Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods
AAAS