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image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

By | December 21, 2015

Italian scientists are under investigation for allegedly worsening the transmission of a pathogen that is decimating olive groves in Puglia.

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image: Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

By | December 9, 2015

Commensal bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tracts of cockroaches lace the insects’ feces with chemical cues that mediate social behavior, according to a study.

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image: Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

By | December 6, 2015

The popular type 2 diabetes drug may cause profound changes in patients’ microbiomes.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Stressed Shore Crabs

Stressed Shore Crabs

By | November 12, 2015

Electrical shocks cause a physiological stress response in invertebrates previously thought incapable of feeling pain.

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