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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Implanted Magnetic Probes Measure Brain Activity

Implanted Magnetic Probes Measure Brain Activity

By | November 1, 2017

Micrometer-size magnetrodes detect activity-generated magnetic fields within living brains.

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image: Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

By | November 1, 2017

Newly designed sensors detect the magnetic fields generated by electrical activity within cat brains.

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image: Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

By , , and | November 1, 2017

Recent advances in single-cell omics and other techniques are revealing variation at genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptomic levels.

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image: Lessons in Memory from a Champ

Lessons in Memory from a Champ

By | November 1, 2017

A four-time winner of the USA Memory Championship is helping scientists understand how the brain works.

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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

By , , and | November 1, 2017

No two neurons are alike. What does that mean for brain function?

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image: Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

By | October 31, 2017

Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex. 

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image: Image of the Day: Fear Center

Image of the Day: Fear Center

By | October 26, 2017

A set of neurons in the brain’s central amygdala plays a key role in forming memories of aversive experiences, scientists find in mice.  

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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