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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | October 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Watch This Biofilm

Watch This Biofilm

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers encoded moving images in DNA within living cells.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Rise of the Necrofauna</em>

Book Excerpt from Rise of the Necrofauna

By | October 1, 2017

In chapter 4, “Why Recreate the Woolly Mammoth?” author Britt Wray explores the social consequences of bringing an iconic species back from extinction.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

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