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image: Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

By and | July 11, 2017

Modeling gives insight to the critical role of streamflow conditions when assessing the concentrations of endocrine disrupting compounds.  

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image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

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The cell-surface receptor, SIRP-alpha, initiates the innate immune response in hosts.  

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image: Image of the Day: Save the Frogs

Image of the Day: Save the Frogs

By | June 23, 2017

Small but striking with its eyebrow-like horns, the 6-centimeter smooth horned frog (Proceratophrys boiei) was one of 453 amphibian species in Brazil assessed in a recent conservation study.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Image of the Day: Heart On Your Sleeve

Image of the Day: Heart On Your Sleeve

By | May 31, 2017

The entire underbelly of a newly discovered glassfrog species (Hyalinobatrachium yaku) is see-through, allowing the beholder to peer into its heart. 

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