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image: Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.

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image: Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

By Bob Grant | January 1, 2018

Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.

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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By Abby Olena | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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image: Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

In tiny doses, the pufferfish’s tetrodotoxin can be turned into a pain-relieving ion channel blocker.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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image: The Best Multimedia of 2017

The Best Multimedia of 2017

By Catherine Offord | December 27, 2017

Editors’ picks of the year’s best in The Scientist infographics.

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image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By Katarina Zimmer | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.

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image: CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

By Abby Olena | December 20, 2017

Researchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears. 

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