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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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image: Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

By | January 1, 2018

In tiny doses, the pufferfish’s tetrodotoxin can be turned into a pain-relieving ion channel blocker.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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The nine plaintiffs allege the university’s actions put women at risk.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Jane on the Brain</em>

Book Excerpt from Jane on the Brain

By | December 1, 2017

In chapter 3, “The Sense of Sensibility,” author Wendy Jones uses scenes from one of Jane Austen’s most celebrated novels to illustrate the functioning of the body’s stress response system.

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A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.

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image: Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

By | December 1, 2017

Jane Austen can teach us a lot about how our brains handle uncertainty.

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