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image: Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

By Shawna Williams | January 1, 2018

Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.

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image: Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.

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image: Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

By Bob Grant | January 1, 2018

Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.

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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By Abby Olena | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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image: Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

In tiny doses, the pufferfish’s tetrodotoxin can be turned into a pain-relieving ion channel blocker.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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image: Image of the Day: Brain Barrier Balls

Image of the Day: Brain Barrier Balls

By The Scientist Staff | June 7, 2017

In a new and improved in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, scientists allow a milieu of cells to grow together and form multicellular structures.

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image: RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening

RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening

By Catherine Offord | April 17, 2017

A recent CRISPR study contradicted years of RNA interference research on a well-studied cancer drug target. But is it the last nail in the coffin for RNAi as a screening tool? 

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