The Scientist

» pregnancy and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By Jef Akst | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.


image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By Kerry Grens | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

1 Comment

image: Sleeping for Two

Sleeping for Two

By Kerry Grens | March 1, 2016

Poor slumber during pregnancy may have consequences beyond gestation.


image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By Wudan Yan | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

1 Comment

image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By Ashley P. Taylor | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.


image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By Anna Azvolinsky | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.


image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By Kerry Grens | February 1, 2016

Link to microcephaly questioned; vaccine timeline expedited; thousands of Zika-exposed pregnancies reported in Colombia


image: Contributors


By Karen Zusi | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?
  2. Renowned Physicist Stephen Hawking Dies
  3. John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, Dies
  4. High-Fiber Diet Shifts Gut Microbes, Lowering Blood Sugar in Diabetics