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image: Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

By | May 14, 2013

Should institutions invest in changing the behavior of scientists found guilty of violating research rules and ethics?

3 Comments

image: We're All Connected

We're All Connected

By | May 1, 2013

A look at some of biology’s communication networks

0 Comments

image: Italy Animal Lab Trashed

Italy Animal Lab Trashed

By | April 24, 2013

Animal-rights activists devastate a psychiatric research lab at the University of Milan.

5 Comments

image: Female Anthropologists Harassed

Female Anthropologists Harassed

By | April 15, 2013

A new survey finds a high incidence of sexual harassment and rape among women doing anthropological field work.

7 Comments

image: Review: <em>Errors of the Human Body</em>

Review: Errors of the Human Body

By | April 11, 2013

This dramatic science fiction film follows a grieving father using his research to understand his infant son’s gruesome death—and explores the culture and ethics of science along the way.

5 Comments

image: Review: Gossamer Gallants

Review: Gossamer Gallants

By | April 5, 2013

The insect-inspired dance by choreographer Paul Taylor strikes the perfect balance between six-legged realism and artistic fancy.

0 Comments

image: Atoms and Arias

Atoms and Arias

By | March 22, 2013

A Portuguese professor explores the poisons and potions of opera.

2 Comments

image: Snobby Scientists

Snobby Scientists

By | March 21, 2013

Does the preference of many scientists to only hear talks from successful institutions limit the reach of innovation?

2 Comments

image: La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

By | March 15, 2013

The sculptures of Mara G. Haseltine's new exhibition tell a tale of beautiful oceans ravaged by pollution.

0 Comments

image: Love Song for an Ailing Planet

Love Song for an Ailing Planet

By | March 15, 2013

Artist Mara G. Haseltine unveils her latest exhibition of science-inspired sculpture, a melancholy ode to marine plankton set to the music of Puccini.

0 Comments

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