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image: Flies’ Feet Can Spread Bacteria

Flies’ Feet Can Spread Bacteria

By | November 27, 2017

Lab experiments and metagenomic analyses of flies’ resident bacteria indicate that the insects carry microbes from place to place on their legs.

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image: European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

By | November 20, 2017

Fotis Kafatos, a Greek researcher famous for his work on malaria, has died at age 77.

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image: Image of the Day: The Last Sloth

Image of the Day: The Last Sloth

By | November 16, 2017

An artist’s impression suggests what the Caribbean may have looked like before humans arrived. 

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A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 

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image: FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

By | October 19, 2017

The therapy, produced by Kite Pharma and owned by Gilead Sciences, is approved for use against some types of large B-cell lymphomas. 

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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image: Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

By | October 16, 2017

In mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them—but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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