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image: CRISPR Corrects RNA-based Disease Defects

CRISPR Corrects RNA-based Disease Defects

By | August 10, 2017

In human cells, researchers deploy the genome editor to snip out toxic repetitive sequences.

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image: Additional #IceBucketChallenge Payoffs

Additional #IceBucketChallenge Payoffs

By | July 28, 2016

Researchers identify a new ALS-associated gene thanks to funds generated by the social media challenge that went viral in summer 2014.

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image: Book Review: <em>Personal Trials</em>

Book Review: Personal Trials

By | March 22, 2016

At first blush, do-it-yourself clinical trials seem pointless and reckless. But a deeper truth pervades the research and the patients who drive it forward.

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image: Formaldehyde Fears

Formaldehyde Fears

By | October 1, 2015

Data on the links between ALS and the chemical have been contradictory, but the latest study suggests undertakers are at risk.

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image: Undertaker's Bane

Undertaker's Bane

By | October 1, 2015

Harvard Professor Marc Weisskopf discusses the potential link between formaldehyde and ALS.

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image: ALS Drug Access Debated

ALS Drug Access Debated

By | April 7, 2015

Biotech company Genervon has requested accelerated approval for its experimental ALS drug after a small but promising Phase 2 trial. Patients advocate for its acceptance, while researchers urge caution.

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image: Beneficial Stats

Beneficial Stats

By | March 1, 2015

Statisticians who normally crunch numbers to forecast trends in the food-service industry turn their attention to bettering treatment of ALS.

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The ALS Association has raised more than $100 million in donations through a charity campaign that went viral. How should that money be spent?

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image: Ice Bucket Challenge Irony

Ice Bucket Challenge Irony

By | August 25, 2014

Several US legislators who voted in favor of a bill that cut federal funding for ALS research have taken the chilly plunge for charity.

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image: Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

By | February 7, 2013

Protein aggregates in the brains of some people with dementia or motor neuron disease have a surprising origin.

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