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image: Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

By | October 31, 2017

Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex. 

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image: The Rabies Vaccine Backstory

The Rabies Vaccine Backstory

By | June 1, 2016

Louis Pasteur’s trepidation at injecting a child with the first rabies vaccine might have reflected his private knowledge of its lack of prior animal testing.

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image: Viral Trek to the Brain

Viral Trek to the Brain

By | September 3, 2014

Rabies hitches a ride with a receptor for nerve growth factor.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | September 18, 2012

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: As bats hibernate so does rabies

As bats hibernate so does rabies

By | June 6, 2011

A new study shows that a long winter's nap slows the spread of rabies through colonies of the flying mammal and is thus essential for the long-term viability of their populations.

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