The Scientist

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image: Vanishing Batteries

Vanishing Batteries

By | March 26, 2014

Researchers describe a major component of biodegradable implants.

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image: DNA Bends Control Gene Activation

DNA Bends Control Gene Activation

By | March 25, 2014

Genomic structures called i-motifs signal DNA activation, while hairpin loops signal gene suppression.  

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Positive Developments on the HIV Front

Positive Developments on the HIV Front

By | March 7, 2014

A gene-editing protocol shows promise, and a second baby who was started on antiretroviral drugs soon after birth appears to be virus-free a year later.

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image: High Protein, High Risk?

High Protein, High Risk?

By | March 6, 2014

Low-protein diets are linked to longer life spans in mice and humans.

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

3 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

By | March 1, 2014

Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, University College London. Age: 32

2 Comments

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