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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.

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Critics of the proposed curriculum say it leaves out important information relating to climate change and evolution.

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Mice receiving the treatment produced their own monoclonal antibodies and survived infection with the life-threatening pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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image: Designer DNA

Designer DNA

By | October 1, 2017

Computational tools for mapping out synthetic nucleic acids

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | October 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Watch This Biofilm

Watch This Biofilm

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers encoded moving images in DNA within living cells.

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image: Making DNA Data Storage a Reality

Making DNA Data Storage a Reality

By | October 1, 2017

A few kilograms of DNA could theoretically store all of humanity’s data, but there are practical challenges to overcome.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: Infographic: Writing with DNA

Infographic: Writing with DNA

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers devise numerous strategies to encode information into nucleic acids.

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