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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By Mary Beth Aberlin | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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Contributors

By Karen Zusi | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Fearless about Folding

By Anna Azvolinsky | January 1, 2016

Susan Lindquist has never shied away from letting her curiosity guide her research career.

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image: Managing Methylation

Managing Methylation

By Karen Zusi | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

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image: Master Folder

Master Folder

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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Reveling in the Revealed

By Kelly Rae Chi | January 1, 2016

A growing toolbox for surveying the activity of entire genomes

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Smooth Move

By Ashley P. Taylor | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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Speaking of Science

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Telomerase Overdrive

By Ashley P. Taylor | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By Dan Dominissini, Chuan He, and and Gidi Rechavi | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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