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Critics of the proposed curriculum say it leaves out important information relating to climate change and evolution.

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Mice receiving the treatment produced their own monoclonal antibodies and survived infection with the life-threatening pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Designer DNA

Designer DNA

By Rachel Berkowitz | October 1, 2017

Computational tools for mapping out synthetic nucleic acids

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image: Making DNA Data Storage a Reality

Making DNA Data Storage a Reality

By Catherine Offord | October 1, 2017

A few kilograms of DNA could theoretically store all of humanity’s data, but there are practical challenges to overcome.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Kerr | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By Andrew F. Read and Peter J. Kerr | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Infographic: Writing with DNA

Infographic: Writing with DNA

By Catherine Offord | October 1, 2017

Researchers devise numerous strategies to encode information into nucleic acids.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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