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image: Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

By | September 5, 2017

Genetic variants in Alzheimer’s- and smoking-related genes appear to be under selection pressure, according to a study comparing the genomes of old and young participants.

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image: Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

Global Patterns of Human Epigenetic Variation

By | August 28, 2017

A study of five far-flung human populations gives clues to adaptations to environmental pressures.

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image: Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

By | August 11, 2017

The turtle-headed sea snake is losing its stripes, and researchers suggest that the change reflects adaptation to fouled oceans.

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image: Open Access On the Rise: Study

Open Access On the Rise: Study

By | August 7, 2017

The Scientist sat down with one of the authors of a recent analysis that quantifies the increasing incursion of open-access content into the world of scholarly publishing.

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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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These institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.

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image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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