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image: Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

By Jef Akst | August 3, 2017

An arrest warrant has been issued for Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University in connection with a stabbing death in Chicago.


image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By Ashley P. Taylor | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.


image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By Tracy Vence | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.


image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.


At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By Tracy Vence | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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image: Microbe Maven

Microbe Maven

By The Scientist Staff | July 17, 2017

Meet Scientist to Watch Emily Balskus, who studies the microbes that inhabit humans.


image: Microbiota Manipulations

Microbiota Manipulations

By Ruth Williams | July 17, 2017

Two research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.


image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By Ruth Williams | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 


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