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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: Rusty Waves of Grain

Rusty Waves of Grain

By | June 1, 2014

See how a ruinous fungus that attacks wheat wreaks its damage.

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

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image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?

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image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

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image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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