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image: Ballroom Brainwaves

Ballroom Brainwaves

By | March 28, 2014

A neuroscientist studies the brains of tango dancers in an attempt to understand interpersonal connectedness.

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image: Week in Review: March 10–14

Week in Review: March 10–14

By | March 14, 2014

Whole-genome sequencing in the clinic; blood-based biomarkers predict future cognitive problems; how some pain meds inhibit bacterial growth; ResearchGate launches Open Review

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image: Whole-Genome Growing Pains

Whole-Genome Growing Pains

By | March 11, 2014

Small study suggests that whole-genome sequencing faces several hurdles before it can be used routinely in the clinic.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Lucky Planet</em>

Book Excerpt from Lucky Planet

By | March 1, 2014

In the book's prologue, author David Waltham compares a fictitious planet to Earth, highlighting the biologically supportive luck that our planet has enjoyed.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

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image: Is Earth Special?

Is Earth Special?

By | March 1, 2014

Reconsidering the uniqueness of life on our planet

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Genomenclature?

Genomenclature?

By | February 24, 2014

Researchers propose a naming system based on genomic information for all Earth’s life.

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image: Royal Treatment

Royal Treatment

By | February 12, 2014

Scientists in the U.K. will sequence the genome of King Richard III.

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image: Review: “Please Continue”

Review: “Please Continue”

By | February 11, 2014

A play that dramatizes Stanley Milgram’s infamous social psychology experiments from the 1960s captures the personal side of human research.

4 Comments

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