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image: Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

By Kerry Grens | April 27, 2017

A screen of human embryonic stem cell lines finds several that accumulated changes in the gene TP53, including aberrations commonly seen in cancer.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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image: 45 Feet High and Rising

45 Feet High and Rising

By The Scientist Staff | April 24, 2017

Maize enthusiast Jason Karl aims to continue breaking his own records for the tallest corn plants ever grown.

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image: Image of the Day: Fungal Forms

Image of the Day: Fungal Forms

By The Scientist Staff | April 20, 2017

By sequencing and analyzing the genomes of more than 20 species of Penicillium fungi, researches uncovered genes encoding for numerous bioactive compounds, including antibiotics.

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image: CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 12, 2017

Using CRISPR-Cpf1 gene editing, researchers have fixed mutations that cause a form of muscular dystrophy in cultured human cardiomyocytes and a mouse model.

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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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23andMe customers can now receive information about genetic risk for diseases including Parkinson’s and celiac.

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Octopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process. 

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image: Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

By Ruth Williams | April 5, 2017

Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By Jef Akst | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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