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image: USDA Emails: Don’t Use “Climate Change”

USDA Emails: Don’t Use “Climate Change”

By | August 8, 2017

The agency denies instructing staff to avoid particular terms.

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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image: Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research

Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research

By | July 20, 2017

The choice of an economics professor and climate change denialist is slammed by science advocates.

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image: Study: Bumblebee Species Declining Worldwide

Study: Bumblebee Species Declining Worldwide

By | July 20, 2017

The first global evaluation of populations demonstrates that certain species are diminishing considerably.

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image: Lubchenco on Conservation

Lubchenco on Conservation

By | July 17, 2017

Former NOAA administrator and environmental scientist Jane Lunchenco discusses the importance of science in the face of climate change.

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Scientists bring marine plankton back to life to study past climate change.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 17, 2017

The NIH budget, the nature of science, paternal age, and more

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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Rather than offering grant funds to US researchers, some French researchers wish Macron would commit to funding domestic labs. 

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The UC Davis agroecologist grew up on a farm and now works to help farmers grow more resilient crops.

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