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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | July 1, 2014

Sex on Earth, Wild Connection, The Classification of Sex, and XL Love


image: Activating Beige Fat

Activating Beige Fat

By Kerry Grens | June 5, 2014

An innate immune pathway stimulates the activity of heat-producing adipose tissue in mice.


image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By Kerry Grens | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: The Obesity Burden

The Obesity Burden

By Jef Akst | May 29, 2014

A global study of obesity reveals that an increasing number of people around the world are overweight.


image: Obesity Complicates Colorectal Cancer

Obesity Complicates Colorectal Cancer

By Tracy Vence | April 9, 2014

Study finds that prediagnosis obesity is predictive of poor prognosis, even among patients who have a molecular marker associated with better disease outcome.

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image: Shivering Akin to Exercising

Shivering Akin to Exercising

By Kerry Grens | February 4, 2014

Working out and shivering in the cold both upregulate hormones and genes involved in brown fat production.


image: Brain Circuit Toggles Eating

Brain Circuit Toggles Eating

By Kerry Grens | September 26, 2013

A network of neurons in the hypothalamus can turn feeding behavior on or off with the flip of an optogenetic switch in mice.  


image: Obesity via Microbe Transplants

Obesity via Microbe Transplants

By Ed Yong | September 5, 2013

Germ-free mice gain weight when transplanted with gut microbes from obese humans, in a diet-dependent manner.


image: Obesity-Fighting Drug May Improve Metabolism

Obesity-Fighting Drug May Improve Metabolism

By Erin Weeks | September 3, 2013

Initial tests of a hormone therapy suggest it reduces LDL cholesterol and improves weight loss in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.


image: Gut Microbe Diversity, Weight Linked

Gut Microbe Diversity, Weight Linked

By Chris Palmer | August 29, 2013

A genetic mapping study of intestinal bacteria shows that people with fewer and less diverse bacteria are at greater risk of obesity and associated diseases.


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