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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Jane on the Brain</em>

Book Excerpt from Jane on the Brain

By Wendy Jones | December 1, 2017

In chapter 3, “The Sense of Sensibility,” author Wendy Jones uses scenes from one of Jane Austen’s most celebrated novels to illustrate the functioning of the body’s stress response system.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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image: Passing the Torch

Passing the Torch

By Mary Beth Aberlin | December 1, 2017

Looking back, looking forward

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image: Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

By Wendy Jones | December 1, 2017

Jane Austen can teach us a lot about how our brains handle uncertainty.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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