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The Scientist

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image: Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

Toxin from a Dangerous Fish Delicacy

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

In tiny doses, the pufferfish’s tetrodotoxin can be turned into a pain-relieving ion channel blocker.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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image: Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research Dies

Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research Dies

By Kerry Grens | December 28, 2017

Ben Barres of Stanford University described glia’s roles in ensuring neurons’ proper synapse formation and in responding to brain injury.

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image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By Katarina Zimmer | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.

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image: New Resource Ranks Chemical Probes for Human Proteins

New Resource Ranks Chemical Probes for Human Proteins

By Abby Olena | December 14, 2017

With many probes being seriously flawed, Probe Miner helps researchers find those that are most specific and effective for manipulating their chosen proteins.

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By Kerry Grens | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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