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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf

The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf

By | September 22, 2017

In a case of acoustic deception, caterpillars mimic bird alarm calls to defend themselves.

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