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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.

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image: Image of the Day: Fangaroo

Image of the Day: Fangaroo

By | October 19, 2017

Fanged kangaroos in Australia were thought to have gone extinct 15 million years ago, but new evidence suggests they were around for at least 5 million more years.

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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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Plantings of non-GM refuges counter the development of resistance.

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