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image: Irma Leaves Scientists Cut Off from Labs

Irma Leaves Scientists Cut Off from Labs

By | September 11, 2017

At the University of Miami School of Medicine and elsewhere, personnel remain barred from campuses for safety reasons.

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image: Optimism for Key Deer After Hurricane Irma

Optimism for Key Deer After Hurricane Irma

By | September 11, 2017

A refuge for the endangered species on Big Pine Key in Florida took a direct kit, but several deer have been spotted.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Research Labs Evacuate Ahead of Irma

Research Labs Evacuate Ahead of Irma

By | September 7, 2017

Scientists leave behind ongoing experiments as the Category 5 hurricane whips through the Caribbean and heads toward the U.S. mainland.

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image: Opinion: The Flood Reduction Benefits of Wetlands

Opinion: The Flood Reduction Benefits of Wetlands

By and | August 31, 2017

Conservationists and the insurance industry team up to model the economic benefits of marshes during hurricanes.

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image: Science Labs Offer Help to Texas Researchers

Science Labs Offer Help to Texas Researchers

By | August 29, 2017

Sparked by a tweet from a Philadelphia scientist, the March for Science–Houston has launched a database of facilities offering to host reagents and researchers. 

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image: Flooding in Texas Blocks Researchers from Campuses

Flooding in Texas Blocks Researchers from Campuses

By | August 28, 2017

Marine Science Institute on the Gulf experiences damage; “rideout teams” keep watch over animals and facilities. 

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image: Labs in Texas Batten Down the Hatches

Labs in Texas Batten Down the Hatches

By and | August 25, 2017

As Hurricane Harvey approaches land, researchers wait to see if their preparations will protect their experiments.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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