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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By Catherine Offord | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By Rob Knight and Jack Gilbert | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

2 Comments

image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By Jef Akst | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By Kerry Grens | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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Contributors

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By Wudan Yan | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

1 Comment

image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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