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image: Stem Cells Traced To Heart

Stem Cells Traced To Heart

By Tia Ghose | December 1, 2011

New research suggests that a controversial class of stem cells originates in the heart and retains some ability to repair damaged tissue.

3 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

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image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By Richard P. Grant | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By Richard P. Grant | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

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image: Sensing Fat

Sensing Fat

By Beverly J. Tepper and Kathleen L. Keller | December 1, 2011

Are genes that alter the perception of fat making us fat?

33 Comments

image: Teen DNA Detectives

Teen DNA Detectives

By Kerry Grens | December 1, 2011

Genomicist Mark Stoeckle and three high school students have taken do-it-yourself science to a new level. 

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image: Barcode High

Barcode High

By Kerry Grens | December 1, 2011

The story of a group of high school students who, with the help of a Rockefeller University researcher, conducted and published studies on the biological provenance of sushi and teas from around New York City.

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image: Breaching the Wall

Breaching the Wall

By Rachel Nuwer | December 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in immunology

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image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By Richard P. Grant | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

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