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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Image of the Day: Heart Shapes

Image of the Day: Heart Shapes

By | September 29, 2017

High-resolution MRI reveals that human fetal hearts rapidly develop their major structures within a four-day period.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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image: Image of the Day: Mitochondria, Live and in Color

Image of the Day: Mitochondria, Live and in Color

By | September 27, 2017

Mitochondria age differently depending upon whether they’re located in the liver, heart, or kidney, scientists find in flies and mice.

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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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