The Scientist

» heart and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

0 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

0 Comments

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

0 Comments

image: PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk

PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk

By | March 22, 2017

A cholesterol-lowering drug significantly cut the risk of heart attack and stroke in a recent study. But is it worth the steep cost?

0 Comments

Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Electronic Beats

Image of the Day: Electronic Beats

By | February 27, 2017

Scientists create an artificial heart fiber that can mimic the movement in a living heart.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  2. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  3. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  4. CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials