The Scientist

» heart, evolution, neuroscience and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By Jef Akst | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

image: Rewriting <em>E. coli</em>’s Genetic Code

Rewriting E. coli’s Genetic Code

By Sabine Louët | August 5, 2011

Researchers use directed evolution to create a bacterial strain that substitutes a synthetic base for thymine.

6 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

image: Estrogen’s New Role

Estrogen’s New Role

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 2, 2011

The well-studied hormone functions as a neurotransmitter in the brains of zebra finches.

0 Comments

image: Anti-evolution Vandals?

Anti-evolution Vandals?

By Edyta Zielinska | August 1, 2011

Pro-evolution bumper stickers and emblems are being removed from the cars of biologists in Florida.

72 Comments

image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By Tom Curran | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: Harmful Bacterial Metabolites

Harmful Bacterial Metabolites

By Michelle G. Rooks and Wendy S. Garrett | August 1, 2011

Gut bacteria that feed on healthy food appear to amplify the nutritional benefits of those foods. However, they also appear to amplify the undesirable effects of unhealthy food. 

0 Comments

image: Memory Aid

Memory Aid

By Richard P. Grant | August 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Neuroscience

3 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By Hannah Waters | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: An Unlichenly Pair

An Unlichenly Pair

By Hannah Waters | August 1, 2011

A young botanist pays tribute to his mentor by naming a newly discovered, rare species in his honor.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open Access
  4. Researchers Develop a Drug Against the Common Cold