Loading...

The Scientist

» viruses, immunology, evolution and culture

Most Recent

Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

1 Comment

The test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.

1 Comment

image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

0 Comments

image: How Viruses Attack Plants

How Viruses Attack Plants

By Claire Asher | February 1, 2018

Viruses are incapable of reproducing without the help of a host, whose cells copy their genetic material and fabricate the building blocks of new virus particles.

0 Comments

image: Researchers Learn from Plant Viruses to Protect Crops

Researchers Learn from Plant Viruses to Protect Crops

By Claire Asher | February 1, 2018

Plants are locked in an ancient arms race with hostile viruses, but genome editing is giving crops the upper hand.

1 Comment

image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

0 Comments

The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

By The Scientist Staff | January 24, 2018

Insect wings may have evolved from multiple origins, say researchers.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Estonia Offers Free Genetic Testing to Residents
  2. Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains
  3. New Ovarian Cancer Vaccine Shows Promise
  4. The Second March for Science a Smaller Affair