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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Cooperative Control

Cooperative Control

By | February 10, 2015

With the help of a virus that infects its prey’s nervous system, a parasitoid wasp coerces a lady beetle to protect its young.

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image: TS Live: The Enemy Within

TS Live: The Enemy Within

By | February 1, 2015

How viruses wield tiny molecules of RNA to help them persist in our bodies for years, decades, and sometimes an entire life span

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image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

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