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image: Local Microbes Give Wine Character

Local Microbes Give Wine Character

By | September 24, 2015

Yeast strains from different regions of New Zealand generate wines with varying chemistries.

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image: Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury

Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury

By | September 17, 2015

A collagen patch seeded with a regenerative protein helps mice and pigs regain cardiac function after a heart attack.

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image: Skin Microbes Help Clear Infection

Skin Microbes Help Clear Infection

By | September 16, 2015

In a small study, researchers find a link between an individual’s skin microbiome and the ability to clear a bacterial infection. 

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image: Traditional Medicine for Leishmaniasis

Traditional Medicine for Leishmaniasis

By | September 14, 2015

A plant used in traditional Mayan remedies to cure the parasitic infection produces a potent compound.

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image: Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

By | September 14, 2015

From the same Siberian permafrost where three others were previously discovered, scientists find a fourth type of giant virus.

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image: Telltale Mouth Microbes

Telltale Mouth Microbes

By | September 9, 2015

The composition of the plaque microbiome can reveal a child’s risk of dental caries months before the decay appears, according to a study.

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image: Adapting to Elevated CO<sub>2</sub>

Adapting to Elevated CO2

By | September 1, 2015

High carbon dioxide levels can irreversibly rev up a cyanobacterium’s ability to fix nitrogen over the long term, a study finds.

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image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

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image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

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