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image: New Suspect in <em>E. coli</em> Deaths

New Suspect in E. coli Deaths

By Jessica P. Johnson | July 6, 2011

Fenugreek seeds are banned in Europe after authorities point the finger at them as a potential source of the deadly E. coli outbreak.

6 Comments

image: Repainting Ancient Birds

Repainting Ancient Birds

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2011

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.

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image: C-ing with the Lights Out

C-ing with the Lights Out

By Richard P. Grant | July 1, 2011

I the dark Arctic shallows one research finds heterotrophic marine bacteria doing a surprising amount of carbon fixing.

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image: Thymus Finder

Thymus Finder

By Richard P. Grant | July 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Immunology

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By Karen Hopkin | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

12 Comments

image: Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2011

Member, Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: Probiotic Protection

Probiotic Protection

By Richard P. Grant | July 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in microbiology

12 Comments

image: Trading Pelts for Pestilence

Trading Pelts for Pestilence

By Jef Akst | July 1, 2011

When European explorers and fishermen began to frequent Canada’s shores in the 16th century, they brought with them a plethora of tools and trinkets, including knives, axes, kettles, and blankets. 

6 Comments

image: Color by Number Fossils

Color by Number Fossils

By Megan Scudellari | June 30, 2011

Researchers map pigments in early bird fossils using preserved metallic residues.

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image: Warm-Blooded Dinos?

Warm-Blooded Dinos?

By Jef Akst | June 24, 2011

Evidence that large dinosaurs had body temperatures similar to modern-day mammals suggests they were either endothermic or extremely good at conserving body heat.

3 Comments

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